LS Public Server New IP

LS Public Server New IP

..:: LS Public Server ::..#1      |       IP :


For more reason complaints for lag and some problem we are forced to change IP , we found in old IP for all players , this is IP :

Server have rank same man, time players (kills,dead everything need for players) we trasnfer rank two gametracker not lose anything all data trasnfer 😉

All players have acces , and have admin again are admin no lose admin you have same pasword no change – Link Server  – Link Server


Main article: Bada

The Bada operating system for smartphones was announced by Samsung in November 2009. [106] [107] The first Bada-based phone was the Samsung Wave S8500, released in June 2010. [108] [109] Samsung shipped 4.5 million phones running Bada and Q2 of 2011. [110] In 2013, Bada merged with a similar platform called Tizen.
Firefox OS
Main article: Firefox OS

Firefox OS was demonstrated by Mozilla and February 2012. It was designed to have a complete community-based alternative system for mobile devices, using open standards and HTML5 applications. The first commercially available Firefox OS phones were ZTE Open and Alcatel One Touch Fire. As of 2014, more companies have partnered with Mozilla including Panasonic (which is making a smart TV with Firefox OS) and Sony. [111] In December 2015, Mozilla announced that it would phase out development of Firefox OS for smartphones, and would reposition the project to focus on other forms of Internet-connected devices. [112]
Palm OS
Main article: Palm OS

In late 2001, Sony launched the Springboard GSM phone module with limited success. In May 2002, Sony released the Palm OS Treo 270 smartphone, that did not support Springboard, with both a touchscreen and a full keyboard. The Treo had wireless Web browsing, e-mail, calendar and contact organizer and mobile third-party applications that could be downloaded or synced with a computer. [113] Handspring was purchased by Palm, Inc. which released the Treo 600 and continued releasing Treo devices with a few Treo devices using Windows Mobile. After buying Palm in 2011, Hewlett-Packard (HP) discontinued its webOS smartphone and tablet production. [114]
Main article: webOS

webOS is a proprietary mobile operating system running on the Linux kernel, initially developed by Palm, which launched with the Palm Pre. After being acquired by HP, two phones (the Veer and the Pre 3) and a tablet (the TouchPad) running webOS were introduced in 2011. On August 18, 2011, HP announced that webOS hardware was to be discontinued [115] but would continue to support and update webOS software and develop the webOS ecosystem. [116] HP released webOS as open source under the name Open webOS, and plans to update it with additional features. [117] On February 25, 2013 HP confirmed that webOS to LG Electronics, who used the operating system for its current “smart” or Internet-connected TVs, but not smartphones. In January 2014, Qualcomm has announced that it has acquired technology patents from HP, which includes all the WebOS patents. [118]
Maemo / MeeGo
Main article: MeeGo

MeeGo is an operating system created from the source code of Moblin (produced by Intel) and Maemo (produced by Nokia). Before that, the Nokia Maemo used on some of its smartphones and internet tablets (such as the Nokia N810 and N900). MeeGo was originally envisioned to power a variety of devices from netbooks, tablets to smartphones and smart TVs. However, the only smartphones which used MeeGo was the Nokia N9 and Nokia N950 (MeeGo v1.2 Harmattan). Following Nokia’s decision to move to Windows Phone OS and 2011 and to cease development MeeGo, the Linux Foundation MeeGo canceled in September 2011 in favor of the development of Tizen.
Application stores
Main article: List of digital distribution platforms for mobile devices

The introduction of Apple’s App Store for the iPhone and iPod Touch in July 2008 popularized manufacturer-hosted online distribution for third-party applications (software and computer programs) focused on a single platform. There are a huge variety of apps, including video games, music products and business tools. Up until that point, smartphone application distribution depended on third-party sources providing applications for multiple platforms, such as GetJar, Handango, Handmark, and PocketGear. Following the success of the App Store, other smartphone manufacturers launched application stores, such as Google’s Android Market (now Google Play) and RIM’s BlackBerry App World in April 2009. In February 2014, 93% of mobile developers were targeting smartphones first for mobile app development.

One of the main characteristics of smartphones is their screen. It usually fills most of the phone’s front surface (about 70%); screen size usually defines the size of a smartphone. Many have an aspect ratio of 16: 9; some are 4: 3 or other ratios. They are measured in diagonal inches, starting from 2:45 inches. [120] Phones with screens larger than 5.2 inches are often called “phablets”. Smartphones with screens over 4.5 inches commonly are shifted while using a single hand, since most thumbs can not reach the entire screen surface, or used in place with both hands. Liquid-crystal displays are the most common; others are IPS, LED, OLED, AMOLED and E Ink displays. In the 2010s, Braille screens, which can be used by visually impaired people are being developed. It is expected that Braille screens will use some type of microfluidics technology.

As with cellphones, a range of accessories are sold for smartphones, including cases, screen protectors, power charging cables, add-on batteries, headphones, combined headphone-microphones which allow a person to use the phone without holding it to the ear, and Bluetooth-enabled powered speakers that enable users to listen to music files stored on their smartphones. Cases range from relatively inexpensive rubber or soft plastic cases which provide moderate protection from bumps and good protection from scratches to more expensive, heavy-duty cases that combine a rubber padding with a hard outer shell. Some cases have a “book” -like form, with a cover that opens the user to use the device; when the cover is closed, it protects the screen. Some “book” -like cases have additional pockets for credit cards, thus enabling people to use them as wallets. Accessories include products sold by the manufacturer of the smartphone and compatible products made by other manufacturers.

Saturn is the sixth planet from the Sun and the second-largest in the Solar System, after Jupiter. It is a gas giant with an average radius about nine times that of Earth.[11][12] Although only one-eighth the average density of Earth, with its larger volume Saturn is just over 95 times more massive.[13][14][15] Saturn is named after the Roman god of agriculture; its astronomical symbol (♄) represents the god’s sickle.

Saturn’s interior is probably composed of a core of iron–nickel and rock (silicon and oxygen compounds). This core is surrounded by a deep layer of metallic hydrogen, an intermediate layer of liquid hydrogen and liquid helium, and finally outside the Frenkel line a gaseous outer layer.[16] Saturn has a pale yellow hue due to ammonia crystals in its upper atmosphere. Electrical current within the metallic hydrogen layer is thought to give rise to Saturn’s planetary magnetic field, which is weaker than Earth’s, but has a magnetic moment 580 times that of Earth due to Saturn’s larger size. Saturn’s magnetic field strength is around one-twentieth of Jupiter’s.[17] The outer atmosphere is generally bland and lacking in contrast, although long-lived features can appear. Wind speeds on Saturn can reach 1,800 km/h (500 m/s), higher than on Jupiter, but not as high as those on Neptune.[18]

Saturn has a prominent ring system that consists of nine continuous main rings and three discontinuous arcs and that is composed mostly of ice particles with a smaller amount of rocky debris and dust. Sixty-two[19] moons are known to orbit Saturn, of which fifty-three are officially named. This does not include the hundreds of moonlets comprising the rings. Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, and the second-largest in the Solar System, is larger than the planet Mercury, although less massive, and is the only moon in the Solar System to have a substantial atmosphere
Saturn is a gas giant because it is predominantly composed of hydrogen and helium (‘gas’). It lacks a definite surface, though it may have a solid core.[21] Saturn’s rotation causes it to have the shape of an oblate spheroid; that is, it is flattened at the poles and bulges at its equator. Its equatorial and polar radii differ by almost 10%: 60,268 km versus 54,364 km, respectively.[4] Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune, the other giant planets in the Solar System, are also oblate but to a lesser extent. Saturn is the only planet of the Solar System that is less dense than water—about 30% less.[22] Although Saturn’s core is considerably denser than water, the average specific density of the planet is 0.69 g/cm3 due to the atmosphere. Jupiter has 318 times the Earth’s mass,[23] while Saturn is 95 times the mass of the Earth.[4] Together, Jupiter and Saturn hold 92% of the total planetary mass in the Solar System.
The outer atmosphere of Saturn contains 96.3% molecular hydrogen and 3.25% helium by volume.[35] The proportion of helium is significantly deficient compared to the abundance of this element in the Sun.[26] The quantity of elements heavier than helium is not known precisely, but the proportions are assumed to match the primordial abundances from the formation of the Solar System. The total mass of these heavier elements is estimated to be 19–31 times the mass of the Earth, with a significant fraction located in Saturn’s core region.[36]

Trace amounts of ammonia, acetylene, ethane, propane, phosphine and methane have been detected in Saturn’s atmosphere.[37][38][39] The upper clouds are composed of ammonia crystals, while the lower level clouds appear to consist of either ammonium hydrosulfide (NH4SH) or water.[40] Ultraviolet radiation from the Sun causes methane photolysis in the upper atmosphere, leading to a series of hydrocarbon chemical reactions with the resulting products being carried downward by eddies and diffusion. This photochemical cycle is modulated by Saturn’s annual seasonal cycle.
Saturn’s atmosphere exhibits a banded pattern similar to Jupiter’s, but Saturn’s bands are much fainter and are much wider near the equator. The nomenclature used to describe these bands is the same as on Jupiter. Saturn’s finer cloud patterns were not observed until the flybys of the Voyager spacecraft during the 1980s. Since then, Earth-based telescopy has improved to the point where regular observations can be made.[41]

The composition of the clouds varies with depth and increasing pressure. In the upper cloud layers, with the temperature in the range 100–160 K and pressures extending between 0.5–2 bar, the clouds consist of ammonia ice. Water ice clouds begin at a level where the pressure is about 2.5 bar and extend down to 9.5 bar, where temperatures range from 185–270 K. Intermixed in this layer is a band of ammonium hydrosulfide ice, lying in the pressure range 3–6 bar with temperatures of 290–235 K. Finally, the lower layers, where pressures are between 10–20 bar and temperatures are 270–330 K, contains a region of water droplets with ammonia in aqueous solution.[42]

Saturn’s usually bland atmosphere occasionally exhibits long-lived ovals and other features common on Jupiter. In 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope imaged an enormous white cloud near Saturn’s equator that was not present during the Voyager encounters and in 1994, another, smaller storm was observed. The 1990 storm was an example of a Great White Spot, a unique but short-lived phenomenon that occurs once every Saturnian year, roughly every 30 Earth years, around the time of the northern hemisphere’s summer solstice.[43] Previous Great White Spots were observed in 1876, 1903, 1933 and 1960, with the 1933 storm being the most famous. If the periodicity is maintained, another storm will occur in about 2020

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