Reklama ne Tab + SMA

Reklama ne Tab + SMA

Reklama ne Tab + SMA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tab (stylized as TaB) is a diet cola soft drink produced by The Coca-Cola Company, introduced in 1963. The soda was popular throughout the 1960s and 1970s, and several variations were made, including Tab Clear as well as caffeine-free versions.

Following studies in the early 1970s that linked saccharin, Tab’s main sweetener, with bladder cancer in rats, the United States Congress mandated warning labels on products containing the sweetener. The label requirement was later repealed when no evidence was found linking saccharin with cancer in humans.

After its introduction in 1982, Diet Coke quickly replaced Tab as the Coca-Cola Company’s most popular diet cola, although Tab still retained a loyal following. Approximately 3 million cases were sold in the United States in 2008.

Tab was introduced as a diet drink in 1963.[2] Tab was created by Coca-Cola after the successful sales and marketing of Diet Rite cola, owned by The Royal Crown Company;[3] previously, Diet Rite had been the only sugarless soda on the market. Tab was marketed to consumers who wanted to “keep tabs” on their weight.[2][4]

Coca-Cola’s marketing research department used its IBM 1401 computer to generate a list of over 185,000 four-letter words with one vowel, adding names suggested by the company’s own staff; the list was stripped of any words deemed unpronounceable or too similar to existing trademarks.[5][full citation needed] From a final list of about twenty names, “Tabb” was chosen, influenced by the possible play on words, and shortened to “Tab” during development. Packaging designer Robert Sidney Dickens gave the name the capitalization pattern (“TaB”) used in the logo as well as creating a new bottle design for the soft drink.[6]

Tab has been reformulated several times. It was initially sweetened with cyclamate. After the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a ban on cyclamate in 1969, sodium saccharin was used. Studies in laboratory rats during the early 1970s linked saccharin with the development of bladder cancer. As a result, the United States Congress mandated that further studies of saccharin be performed and required that all food containing saccharin bear a label warning that the sweetener had been shown to cause cancer in laboratory animals. In the absence of further evidence that saccharin caused cancer in humans, the substance was delisted in 2000 from the U.S. National Toxicology Program’s Report on Carcinogens; this led to the repealing of the warning label requirements for products containing saccharin.[7] In December 2010, the United States Environmental Protection Agency removed saccharin from its list of hazardous substances.[8]

Tab’s popularity began to decline in 1982 with the introduction of Diet Coke, although Tab retained something of a cult following in the United States, where customers purchased about 3 million cases in 2008.[4] The product is also available in the US Virgin Islands, the Southern African Customs Union, Norway (Under the name Tab X-Tra) and Spain. Tab was available in Australia in the 1960s. It was also sold in the United Kingdom in the late 70’s.

The touchscreen display is operated by gestures executed by finger or stylus instead of the mouse, trackpad, and keyboard of larger computers. Portable computers can be classified according to the presence and appearance of physical keyboards. Two species of tablet, the “slate” and “booklet”, do not have physical keyboards and usually accept text and other input by use of a virtual keyboard shown on their touchscreen displays. Distinct from tablets, 2-in-1 PCs all have physical keyboards, but they are either concealable by folding them back and under the touchscreen (“2-in-1 convertible”) or detachable (“2-in-1 detachable”), but 2-in-1s typically also can display a virtual keyboard on their touchscreens when their physical keyboards are concealed or detached. Some 2-in-1s have processors and operating systems like those of laptops, while having the flexibility of operation as a tablet. (See “2-in-1” below for more information.) To compensate for their lack of a physical keyboard, most tablets can connect to independent physical keyboards by wireless Bluetooth.

The form of the tablet was conceptualized in the middle of the 20th century (Stanley Kubrick depicted fictional tablets in the 1968 science fiction film 2001: A Space Odyssey) and prototyped and developed in the last two decades of that century. In 2010,[5] Apple released the iPad, the first mass-market tablet to achieve widespread popularity. Thereafter tablets rapidly rose in ubiquity and briefly became a large product category[6] used for personal, educational and workplace applications. From the mid-2010s, tablet computers started to decline, having been surpassed by both 2-in-1 hybrids and larger-sized smartphones.

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