Addons Catch Silver Edition 3.0.3

Addons Catch Silver Edition 3.0.3

36.Addons Catch Silver Edition 3.0.3

 

 

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; AMX Mod X plugins

; Admin Base – Always one has to be activated
admin.amxx        ; admin base (required for any admin-related)
;admin_sql.amxx        ; admin base – SQL version (comment admin.amxx)

; Basic
admincmd.amxx        ; basic admin console commands
adminhelp.amxx        ; help command for admin console commands
adminslots.amxx        ; slot reservation
multilingual.amxx    ; Multi-Lingual management

;maphandler06.amxx

; Menus
menufront.amxx        ; front-end for admin menus
cmdmenu.amxx        ; command menu (speech, settings)
plmenu.amxx        ; players menu (kick, ban, client cmds.)
telemenu.amxx        ; teleport menu (Fun Module required!)
mapsmenu.amxx        ; maps menu (vote, changelevel)

; Chat / Messages
anti_sayEN.amxx
antiflood.amxx        ; prevent clients from chat-flooding the server
scrollmsg.amxx        ; displays a scrolling message
imessage.amxx        ; displays information messages
adminvote.amxx        ; vote commands

; Map related
nextmap.amxx        ; displays next map in mapcycle
mapchooser.amxx        ; allows to vote for next map
timeleft.amxx        ; displays time left on map

; Configuration
pausecfg.amxx        ; allows to pause and unpause some plugins
statscfg2.amxx        ; allows to manage stats plugins via menu and commands

; Counter-Strike
restmenu.amxx        ; restrict weapons menu
statsx2.amxx        ; stats on death or round end (CSX Module required!)
miscstats2.amxx        ; bunch of events announcement for Counter-Strike
;miscstats.amxx        ; bunch of events announcement for Counter-Strike
stats_logging.amxx    ; weapons stats logging (CSX Module required!)

; Custom – Add 3rd party plugins here

amx_ip.amxx
autorr.amxx
xredirect.amxx
rs_swearfilter.amxx
admin_freelook.amxx
adminlisten170.amxx
bcd_hudtimer.amxx
admin_gag.amxx
amx_cvarguard.amxx
gamenamechanger.amxx
auto_responder0.3.amxx
dontsayips.amxx
rscore.amxx
Bindanticod.amxx
invisible_spectator.amxx
announcement48p.amxx
anticommerce.amxx
admin_check170.amxx
ping_analyzer.amxx
rate.amxx
task_scheduler.amxx
std_admin_color_chat.amxx
adminchat.amxx
amx_ejl_adminchat.amxx
FireRate_Control.amxx
GHW_GHR.amxx
semiclip.amxx
catch_silver_3_3.amxx

Silver is the metallic element with the atomic number 47. Its symbol is Ag, from the Latin argentum, derived from the Greek ὰργὀς (literally “shiny” or “white”), and ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European language root reconstructed as *h2erǵ-, “grey” or “shining”. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it exhibits the highest electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity of any metal. The metal is found in the Earth’s crust in the pure, free elemental form (“native silver”), as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite. Most silver is produced as a byproduct of copper, gold, lead, and zinc refining.

Silver has long been valued as a precious metal. Silver metal is used in many premodern monetary systems in bullion coins, sometimes alongside gold: while it is more abundant than gold, it is much less abundant as a native metal. Its purity is typically measured on a per-mille basis; a 94%-pure alloy is described as “0.940 fine”. As one of the seven metals of antiquity, silver has had an enduring role in most human cultures.

Silver is used in numerous applications other than currency, such as solar panels, water filtration, jewelry, ornaments, high-value tableware and utensils (hence the term silverware), and as an investment medium (coins and bullion). Silver is used industrially in electrical contacts and conductors, in specialized mirrors, window coatings, and in catalysis of chemical reactions. Silver compounds are used in photographic film and X-rays. Dilute silver nitrate solutions and other silver compounds are used as disinfectants and microbiocides (oligodynamic effect), added to bandages and wound-dressings, catheters, and other medical instruments.

Silver is similar in its physical and chemical properties to its two vertical neighbours in group 11 of the periodic table, copper and gold. Its 47 electrons are arranged in the configuration [Kr]4d105s1, similarly to copper ([Ar]3d104s1) and gold ([Xe]4f145d106s1); group 11 is one of the few groups in the d-block which has a completely consistent set of electron configurations.[4] This distinctive electron configuration, with a single electron in the highest occupied s subshell over a filled d subshell, accounts for many of the singular properties of metallic silver.[5]

Silver is an extremely soft, ductile and malleable transition metal, though it is slightly less malleable than gold. Silver crystallizes in a face-centered cubic lattice with bulk coordination number 12, where only the single 5s electron is delocalized, similarly to copper and gold.[6] Unlike metals with incomplete d-shells, metallic bonds in silver are lacking a covalent character and are relatively weak. This observation explains the low hardness and high ductility of single crystals of silver.[7]

Silver has a brilliant white metallic luster that can take a high polish,[8] and which is so characteristic that the name of the metal itself has become a colour name.[5] Unlike copper and gold, the energy required to excite an electron from the filled d band to the s-p conduction band in silver is large enough (around 385 kJ/mol) that it no longer corresponds to absorption in the visible region of the spectrum, but rather in the ultraviolet; hence silver is not a coloured metal.[5] Protected silver has greater optical reflectivity than aluminium at all wavelengths longer than ~450 nm.[9] At wavelengths shorter than 450 nm, silver’s reflectivity is inferior to that of aluminium and drops to zero near 310 nm.[10]

Very high electrical and thermal conductivity is common to the elements in group 11, because their single s electron is free and does not interact with the filled d subshell, as such interactions (which occur in the preceding transition metals) lower electron mobility.[11] The electrical conductivity of silver is the greatest of all metals, greater even than copper, but it is not widely used for this property because of the higher cost. An exception is in radio-frequency engineering, particularly at VHF and higher frequencies where silver plating improves electrical conductivity because those currents tend to flow on the surface of conductors rather than through the interior. During World War II in the US, 13540 tons of silver were used in electromagnets for enriching uranium, mainly because of the wartime shortage of copper.[12][13][14] Pure silver has the highest thermal conductivity of any metal, although the conductivity of carbon (in the diamond allotrope) and superfluid helium-4 are even higher.[4] Silver also has the lowest contact resistance of any metal.[4]

Silver readily forms alloys with copper and gold, as well as zinc. Zinc-silver alloys with low zinc concentration may be considered as face-centred cubic solid solutions of zinc in silver, as the structure of the silver is largely unchanged while the electron concentration rises as more zinc is added. Increasing the electron concentration further leads to body-centred cubic (electron concentration 1.5), complex cubic (1.615), and hexagonal close-packed phases

Naturally occurring silver is composed of two stable isotopes, 107Ag and 109Ag, with 107Ag being slightly more abundant (51.839% natural abundance). This almost equal abundance is rare in the periodic table. The atomic weight is 107.8682(2) u;[15][16] this value is very important because of the importance of silver compounds, particularly halides, in gravimetric analysis.[1] Both isotopes of silver are produced in stars via the s-process (slow neutron capture), as well as in supernovas via the r-process (rapid neutron capture).[17]

Twenty-eight radioisotopes have been characterized, the most stable being 105Ag with a half-life of 41.29 days, 111Ag with a half-life of 7.45 days, and 112Ag with a half-life of 3.13 hours. Silver has numerous meta states, the most stable being 108mAg (t1/2 = 418 years), 110mAg (t1/2 = 249.79 days) and 106mAg (t1/2 = 8.28 days). All of the remaining radioactive isotopes have half-lives of less than an hour, and the majority of these have half-lives of less than three minutes.[18]

Isotopes of silver range in relative atomic mass from 92.950 u (93Ag) to 129.950 u (130Ag);[19] the primary decay mode before the most abundant stable isotope, 107Ag, is electron capture and the primary mode after is beta decay. The primary decay products before 107Ag are palladium (element 46) isotopes, and the primary products after are cadmium (element 48) isotopes.[18]

The palladium isotope 107Pd decays by beta emission to 107Ag with a half-life of 6.5 million years. Iron meteorites are the only objects with a high-enough palladium-to-silver ratio to yield measurable variations in 107Ag abundance. Radiogenic 107Ag was first discovered in the Santa Clara meteorite in 1978.[20] The discoverers suggest the coalescence and differentiation of iron-cored small planets may have occurred 10 million years after a nucleosynthetic event. 107Pd–107Ag correlations observed in bodies that have clearly been melted since the accretion of the solar system must reflect the presence of unstable nuclides in the early solar system

 

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