Counter Strike 1.6 – War

Counter Strike 1.6 – War

Counter Strike 1.6 – War

 

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This  Counter Strike good quality with beautiful skins, new weapons, sounds, gfx sites, models, etc. You can play online or bots. Cs for this you need a computer equipped with a video card of at least 128 mb for the skins are of high quality and a weaker PC can cause low fps.

Counter Strike remains one of the most played shooter games in 2015 due minimalist graphics, gameplay easy and that does not need a new computer. You can play cs on an older PC. Chapter servers have advanced modes, addons and plugins. The most popular ways are: zombie, respawn, gungame, furien. If you open a server in that way you will populate quickly and you can get and donations from the administrator to be paid host.

De_dust2 remain the most played maps and fy_snow. If you have a server at the beginning I recommend using these maps because they will populate more quickly. Then I recommend de_infero, awp_india, de_nuke and de_aztec.

If you have opinions or questions post them below with a comment. You can say what you like and what you do not like this cs. Good luck to frags!

Counter Strike 1.6 WAR features:

  • New Steam Update 2015 Patch
  • Dual Protocol (48 + 47) Client
    Exe Version 1.1.2.7 (cstrike)
  • Compatible with latest sXe Injected anticheat
  • Includes latest CS 1.6 bots
  • Changed the model and texture of the hands
  • Changed player models
  • Fixed old and are included in the new installer realistic sounds
  • Tweaked all sorts of bugs in the game engine
  • Even more realistic graphics part of the game
  • Anti slowhack tool included
  • Playable on Internet and LAN
  • 100% clean rip from Steam GCFs (Game cache files)
  • Added option to launch listen server in LAN mode
  • Added more Counter-Strike 1.6 maps
  • Completely revamped physics project
  • Work Internet bookmarks and Favorites
  • Download and Play

During the 1960s and 1970s, hundreds of fossils were found in East Africa in the regions of the Olduvai Gorge and Lake Turkana. The driving force of these searches was the Leakey family, with Louis Leakey and his wife Mary Leakey, and later their son Richard and daughter-in-law Meave—all successful and world-renowned fossil hunters and palaeoanthropologists. From the fossil beds of Olduvai and Lake Turkana they amassed specimens of the early hominins: the australopithecines and Homo species, and even Homo erectus.

These finds cemented Africa as the cradle of humankind. In the late 1970s and the 1980s, Ethiopia emerged as the new hot spot of palaeoanthropology after “Lucy”, the most complete fossil member of the species Australopithecus afarensis, was found in 1974 by Donald Johanson near Hadar in the desertic Afar Triangle region of northern Ethiopia. Although the specimen had a small brain, the pelvis and leg bones were almost identical in function to those of modern humans, showing with certainty that these hominins had walked erect.[23] Lucy was classified as a new species, Australopithecus afarensis, which is thought to be more closely related to the genus Homo as a direct ancestor, or as a close relative of an unknown ancestor, than any other known hominid or hominin from this early time range; see terms “hominid” and “hominin”.[24] (The specimen was nicknamed “Lucy” after the Beatles’ song “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”, which was played loudly and repeatedly in the camp during the excavations.[25]) The Afar Triangle area would later yield discovery of many more hominin fossils, particularly those uncovered or described by teams headed by Tim D. White in the 1990s, including Ardipithecus ramidus and Ardipithecus kadabba.[26]

In 2013, fossil skeletons of Homo naledi, an extinct species of hominin assigned (provisionally) to the genus Homo, were found in the Rising Star Cave system, a site in South Africa’s Cradle of Humankind region in Gauteng province near Johannesburg.[27][28] As of September 2015, fossils of at least fifteen individuals, amounting to 1550 specimens, have been excavated from the cave.[28] The species is characterized by a body mass and stature similar to small-bodied human populations, a smaller endocranial volume similar to Australopithecus, and a cranial morphology (skull shape) similar to early Homo species. The skeletal anatomy combines primitive features known from australopithecines with features known from early hominins. The individuals show signs of having been deliberately disposed of within the cave near the time of death. The fossils have not yet been dated.

The genetic revolution in studies of human evolution started when Vincent Sarich and Allan Wilson measured the strength of immunological cross-reactions of blood serum albumin between pairs of creatures, including humans and African apes (chimpanzees and gorillas).[30] The strength of the reaction could be expressed numerically as an immunological distance, which was in turn proportional to the number of amino acid differences between homologous proteins in different species. By constructing a calibration curve of the ID of species’ pairs with known divergence times in the fossil record, the data could be used as a molecular clock to estimate the times of divergence of pairs with poorer or unknown fossil records.

In their seminal 1967 paper in Science, Sarich and Wilson estimated the divergence time of humans and apes as four to five million years ago,[30] at a time when standard interpretations of the fossil record gave this divergence as at least 10 to as much as 30 million years. Subsequent fossil discoveries, notably “Lucy”, and reinterpretation of older fossil materials, notably Ramapithecus, showed the younger estimates to be correct and validated the albumin method.

Progress in DNA sequencing, specifically mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and then Y-chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) advanced the understanding of human origins.[31][32][33] Application of the molecular clock principle revolutionized the study of molecular evolution.

On the basis of a separation from the orangutan between 10 and 20 million years ago, earlier studies of the molecular clock suggested that there were about 76 mutations per generation that were not inherited by human children from their parents; this evidence supported the divergence time between hominins and chimps noted above. However, a 2012 study in Iceland of 78 children and their parents suggests a mutation rate of only 36 mutations per generation; this datum extends the separation between humans and chimps to an earlier period greater than 7 million years ago (Ma). Additional research with 226 offspring of wild chimp populations in 8 locations suggests that chimps reproduce at age 26.5 years, on average; which suggests the human divergence from chimps occurred between 7 and 13 million years ago. And these data suggest that Ardipithecus (4.5 Ma), Orrorin (6 Ma) and Sahelanthropus (7 Ma) all may be on the hominin lineage, and even that the separation may have occurred outside the East African Rift region.

Furthermore, analysis of the two species’ genes in 2006 provides evidence that after human ancestors had started to diverge from chimpanzees, interspecies mating between “proto-human” and “proto-chimps” nonetheless occurred regularly enough to change certain genes in the new gene pool:

A new comparison of the human and chimp genomes suggests that after the two lineages separated, they may have begun interbreeding… A principal finding is that the X chromosomes of humans and chimps appear to have diverged about 1.2 million years more recently than the other chromosomes.

The research suggests:

There were in fact two splits between the human and chimp lineages, with the first being followed by interbreeding between the two populations and then a second split. The suggestion of a hybridization has startled paleoanthropologists, who nonetheless are treating the new genetic data seriously.

In the 1990s, several teams of paleoanthropologists were working throughout Africa looking for evidence of the earliest divergence of the hominin lineage from the great apes. In 1994, Meave Leakey discovered Australopithecus anamensis. The find was overshadowed by Tim D. White’s 1995 discovery of Ardipithecus ramidus, which pushed back the fossil record to 4.2 million years ago.

In 2000, Martin Pickford and Brigitte Senut discovered, in the Tugen Hills of Kenya, a 6-million-year-old bipedal hominin which they named Orrorin tugenensis. And in 2001, a team led by Michel Brunet discovered the skull of Sahelanthropus tchadensis which was dated as 7.2 million years ago, and which Brunet argued was a bipedal, and therefore a hominid—that is, a hominin (cf Hominidae; terms “hominids” and hominins).
Anthropologists in the 1980s were divided regarding some details of reproductive barriers and migratory dispersals of the Homo genus. Subsequently, genetics has been used to investigate and resolve these issues. According to the Sahara pump theory evidence suggests that genus Homo have migrated out of Africa at least three and possibly four times (e.g. Homo erectus, Homo heidelbergensis and two or three times for Homo sapiens).

Recent evidence suggests that humans may have left Africa half a million years earlier than previously thought. A joint Franco-Indian team has found human artefacts in the Siwalk Hills north of New Delhi dating back at least 2.6 million years. This is earlier than the previous earliest finding of genus Homo at Dmanisi, in Georgia, dating to 1.85 million years. Although controversial, this strengthens the case that human tools have been found at a Chinese cave 2.48 million years ago.[37] This suggests that the Asian “Chopper” tool tradition, found in Java and northern China may have left Africa before the appearance of the Acheulian hand axe.
Dispersal of modern homo sapiens

The “out of Africa” model proposed that modern H. sapiens speciated in Africa recently (that is, approximately 200,000 years ago) and the subsequent migration through Eurasia resulted in nearly complete replacement of other Homo species. This model has been developed by Chris B. Stringer and Peter Andrews.[38][39] In contrast, the multiregional hypothesis proposed that Homo genus contained only a single interconnected population as it does today (not separate species), and that its evolution took place worldwide continuously over the last couple million years. This model was proposed in 1988 by Milford H. Wolpoff.[40][41]

Sequencing mtDNA and Y-DNA sampled from a wide range of indigenous populations revealed ancestral information relating to both male and female genetic heritage.[42] Aligned in genetic tree differences were interpreted as supportive of a recent single origin.[43] Analyses have shown a greater diversity of DNA patterns throughout Africa, consistent with the idea that Africa is the ancestral home of mitochondrial Eve and Y-chromosomal Adam.[44]

“Out of Africa” has gained support from research using female mitochondrial DNA and the male Y chromosome. After analysing genealogy trees constructed using 133 types of mtDNA, researchers concluded that all were descended from a female African progenitor, dubbed Mitochondrial Eve. “Out of Africa” is also supported by the fact that mitochondrial genetic diversity is highest among African populations.[45]

A broad study of African genetic diversity, headed by Sarah Tishkoff, found the San people had the greatest genetic diversity among the 113 distinct populations sampled, making them one of 14 “ancestral population clusters”. The research also located the origin of modern human migration in south-western Africa, near the coastal border of Namibia and Angola.[46] The fossil evidence was insufficient for Richard Leakey to resolve this debate.[47] Studies of haplogroups in Y-chromosomal DNA and mitochondrial DNA have largely supported a recent African origin.[48] Evidence from autosomal DNA also predominantly supports a Recent African origin. However, evidence for archaic admixture in modern humans had been suggested by some studies.[49]

Recent sequencing of Neanderthal[50] and Denisovan[14] genomes shows that some admixture occurred. Modern humans outside Africa have 2–4% Neanderthal alleles in their genome, and some Melanesians have an additional 4–6% of Denisovan alleles. These new results do not contradict the “out of Africa” model, except in its strictest interpretation. After recovery from a genetic bottleneck that might be due to the Toba supervolcano catastrophe, a fairly small group left Africa and briefly interbred with Neanderthals, probably in the middle-east or even North Africa before their departure. Their still predominantly African descendants spread to populate the world. A fraction in turn interbred with Denisovans, probably in south-east Asia, before populating Melanesia.[51] HLA haplotypes of Neanderthal and Denisova origin have been identified in modern Eurasian and Oceanian populations.[16]

There are still differing theories on whether there was a single exodus from Africa or several. A multiple dispersal model involves the Southern Dispersal theory,[52] which has gained support in recent years from genetic, linguistic and archaeological evidence. In this theory, there was a coastal dispersal of modern humans from the Horn of Africa around 70,000 years ago. This group helped to populate Southeast Asia and Oceania, explaining the discovery of early human sites in these areas much earlier than those in the Levant.[52]

A second wave of humans may have dispersed across the Sinai Peninsula into Asia, resulting in the bulk of human population for Eurasia. This second group possibly possessed a more sophisticated tool technology and was less dependent on coastal food sources than the original group. Much of the evidence for the first group’s expansion would have been destroyed by the rising sea levels at the end of each glacial maximum.[52] The multiple dispersal model is contradicted by studies indicating that the populations of Eurasia and the populations of Southeast Asia and Oceania are all descended from the same mitochondrial DNA lineages, which support a single migration out of Africa that gave rise to all non-African populations.[53]

Stephen Oppenheimer, on the basis of the early date of Badoshan Iranian Aurignacian, suggests that this second dispersal, may have occurred with a pluvial period about 50,000 years before the present, with modern human big-game hunting cultures spreading up the Zagros Mountains, carrying modern human genomes from Oman, throughout the Persian Gulf, northward into Armenia and Anatolia, with a variant travelling south into Israel and to Cyrenicia

 

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    Arjan 2 years

    vlla t’lumt per kejt senet qe i qet ne ket faqe te mrekullueshme

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    elon 2 years

    O admin pse spom bon me marr qit cs

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    Ismail 2 years

    a ka naj CS qe nu ka llag se po i ritet ping edhe sen po luj

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      admin 2 years

      Ska lidhje me CS kto gjera po me rrjetin qe vjen deri tek ti

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    Ismail 2 years

    okk flm

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    eriskajtazi 2 years

    Admin ky cs a osht shqip

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    gent berisha 9 months

    admin a ka skinsa ky cs

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