Addons Super Hero

Addons Super Hero

Addons Super Hero

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Download : Click Here

 

; AMX Mod X plugins

; Admin Base – Always one has to be activated
admin.amxx        ; admin base (required for any admin-related)
;admin_sql.amxx        ; admin base – SQL version (comment admin.amxx)

; Basic
admincmd.amxx        ; basic admin console commands
adminhelp.amxx        ; help command for admin console commands
adminslots.amxx        ; slot reservation
multilingual.amxx    ; Multi-Lingual management

; Menus
menufront.amxx        ; front-end for admin menus
cmdmenu.amxx        ; command menu (speech, settings)
plmenu.amxx        ; players menu (kick, ban, client cmds.)
;telemenu.amxx        ; teleport menu (Fun Module required!)
mapsmenu.amxx        ; maps menu (vote, changelevel)
pluginmenu.amxx        ; Menus for commands/cvars organized by plugin

; Chat / Messages
adminchat.amxx        ; console chat commands
antiflood.amxx        ; prevent clients from chat-flooding the server
scrollmsg.amxx        ; displays a scrolling message
imessage.amxx        ; displays information messages
adminvote.amxx        ; vote commands

; Map related
nextmap.amxx        ; displays next map in mapcycle
mapchooser.amxx        ; allows to vote for next map
timeleft.amxx        ; displays time left on map

; Configuration
pausecfg.amxx        ; allows to pause and unpause some plugins
statscfg.amxx        ; allows to manage stats plugins via menu and commands

; Counter-Strike
;restmenu.amxx        ; restrict weapons menu
statsx.amxx        ; stats on death or round end (CSX Module required!)
;miscstats.amxx        ; bunch of events announcement for Counter-Strike
;stats_logging.amxx    ; weapons stats logging (CSX Module required!)

; Enable to use AMX Mod plugins
;amxmod_compat.amxx    ; AMX Mod backwards compatibility layer

; Custom – Add 3rd party plugins here
dp_test.amxx        ; Vine cu dproto 0.3.7

superheromodmysql.amxx
superheromodnvault.amxx
superheromodvault.amxx

 

In modern popular fiction, a superhero (sometimes rendered super-hero or super hero) is a type of costumed heroic character who possesses supernatural or superhuman powers and who is dedicated to fighting crime, protecting the public, and usually battling supervillains. A female superhero is sometimes called a superheroine (also rendered super-heroine or super heroine). Fiction centered on such characters, especially in American comic books since the 1930s, is known as superhero fiction.

By most definitions, characters do not require actual supernatural or superhuman powers or phenomena to be deemed superheroes.[1][2][3] While the Dictionary.com definition of “superhero” is “a figure, especially in a comic strip or cartoon, endowed with superhuman powers and usually portrayed as fighting evil or crime”,[4] the longstanding Merriam-Webster dictionary gives the definition as “a fictional hero having extraordinary or superhuman powers; also: an exceptionally skillful or successful person”.[5] Terms such as masked crime fighters, costumed adventurers or masked vigilantes are sometimes used to refer to characters such as the Spirit, who may not be explicitly referred to as superheroes but nevertheless share similar traits.

Some superheroes use their powers to counter day-to-day crime while also combating threats against humanity from supervillains, who are their criminal counterparts. Often at least one of these supervillains will be the superhero’s archenemy. Some long-running superheroes such as Superman, Batman, Spider-Man, Wonder Woman, Captain America, and Iron Man have a rogues gallery of many villains.
During the 1940s there were many superheroes, and only a few of these were female. The Flash, Green Lantern and Blue Beetle debuted in this era. This era saw the debut of first known female superhero, writer-artist Fletcher Hanks’s character Fantomah, an ageless ancient Egyptian woman in the modern day who could transform into a skull-faced creature with superpowers to fight evil; she debuted in Fiction House’s Jungle Comics #2 (Feb. 1940), credited to the pseudonymous “Barclay Flagg”.[14][15] The Invisible Scarlet O’Neil, a non-costumed character who fought crime and wartime saboteurs using the superpower of invisibility created by Russell Stamm, would debut in the eponymous syndicated newspaper comic strip a few months later on June 3, 1940.[16]

One superpowered character was portrayed as an antiheroine, a rarity for its time: the Black Widow, a costumed emissary of Satan who killed evildoers in order to send them to Hell — debuted in Mystic Comics #4 (Aug. 1940), from Timely Comics, the 1940s predecessor of Marvel Comics. Most of the other female costumed crime-fighters during this era lacked superpowers. Notable characters include The Woman in Red,[17][18] introduced in Standard Comics’ Thrilling Comics #2 (March 1940); Lady Luck, debuting in the Sunday-newspaper comic-book insert The Spirit Section June 2, 1940; the comedic character Red Tornado, debuting in All-American Comics #20 (Nov 1940); Miss Fury,[19] debuting in the eponymous comic strip by female cartoonist Tarpé Mills on April 6, 1941; the Phantom Lady, introduced in Quality Comics Police Comics #1 (Aug. 1941); the Black Cat,[20][21] introduced in Harvey Comics’ Pocket Comics #1 (also Aug. 1941); and the Black Canary, introduced in Flash Comics #86 (Aug. 1947) as a supporting character.[22] The most iconic comic book superheroine, who debuted during the Golden Age, is Wonder Woman.[23] Inspired by the Amazons of Greek mythology, she was created by psychologist William Moulton Marston, with help and inspiration from his wife Elizabeth and their mutual lover Olive Byrne.[24][25] Wonder Woman’s first appearance was in All Star Comics #8 (Jan. 1942), published by All-American Publications, one of two companies that would merge to form DC Comics in 1944.

1950s[edit]
In 1952, Osamu Tezuka’s manga Tetsuwan Atom (more popularly known in the west as Astro Boy) was published. The series focused upon a robot boy built by a scientist to replace his deceased son. Being built from an incomplete robot originally intended for military purposes Astro Boy possessed amazing powers such as flight through thrusters in his feet and the incredible mechanical strength of his limbs.

The 1950s saw the Silver Age of Comics. During this era DC introduced the likes of Batwoman in 1956, Supergirl, Miss Arrowette, and Bat-Girl; all female derivatives of established male superheroes. 1958 saw the debut of superhero Moonlight Mask on Japanese television.

1960s[edit]
The Marvel Comics teams of the early 1960s typically included at least one (and often the only) female member, much like DC’s flagship superhero team the Justice League of America (whose initial roster included Wonder Woman as the token female); examples include the Fantastic Four’s Invisible Girl, the X-Men’s Jean Grey (originally known as Marvel Girl), the Avengers’ Wasp, and the Brotherhood of Mutants’ Scarlet Witch (who later joined the Avengers). In 1963, Astro Boy was adapted into a highly influential anime television series. Phantom Agents in 1964 focused on ninjas working for the Japanese government and would be the foundation for Sentai-type series. 1966 saw the debut of sci-fi/horror series Ultra Q created by Eiji Tsuburaya this would eventually lead on to the sequel Ultraman, spawning a successful franchise focused upon the Giant Hero subgenre where the Superheroes would be as big as giant monsters (Kaiju) that they fought.

1970s[edit]
In 1972, the Science Ninja Team Gatchaman anime debuted, which built upon the superhero team idea of the live-action Phantom Agents as well as introducing different colors for team members and special vehicles to support them, said vehicles could also combine into a larger one. Another important event was the debut of Mazinger Z by Go Nagai, creating the Super Robot genre. Go Nagai also wrote the manga Cutey Honey in 1973, although the Magical Girl genre already existed, Nagai’s manga introduced Transformation sequences that would become a staple of Magical Girl media.

The 1970s would see more anti-heroes introduced into Superhero fiction such examples included the debut of Shotaro Ishinomori’s Skull Man in 1970, Go Nagai’s Devilman in 1972 and Gerry Conway and John Romita’s Punisher in 1974.

The dark Skull Man manga would later get a television adaptation and underwent drastic changes. The protagonist was redesigned resemble a grasshopper, becoming the renowned first masked hero of the Kamen Rider series. Kamen Rider is a motorcycle riding hero in an insect-like costume, who shouts Henshin (Transform) to don his costume and gain superhuman powers.

The ideas of second-wave feminism, which spread through the 1960s into the 1970s, greatly influenced the way comic book companies would depict as well as market their female characters: Wonder Woman was for a time revamped as a mod-dressing martial artist directly inspired by the Emma Peel character from the British television series The Avengers (no relation to the superhero team of the same name),[26] but later reverted to Marston’s original concept after the editors of Ms. magazine publicly disapproved of the character being depowered and without her traditional costume;[27] Supergirl was moved from being a secondary feature on Action Comics to headline Adventure Comics in 1969; the Lady Liberators appeared in an issue of The Avengers as a group of mind-controlled superheroines led by Valkyrie (actually a disguised supervillainess) and were meant to be a caricatured parody of feminist activists;[28] and Jean Grey became the embodiment of a cosmic being known as the Phoenix Force with seemingly unlimited power in the late 1970s, a stark contrast from her depiction as the weakest member of her team a decade ago.

Both major publishers began introducing new superheroines with a more distinct feminist theme as part of their origin stories and/or character development. Examples include Big Barda, Power Girl, and the Huntress by DC comics; and from Marvel, the second Black Widow, Shanna the She-Devil, and The Cat.[29] Female supporting characters who were successful professionals or hold positions of authority in their own right also debuted in the pages of several popular superhero titles from the late 1950s onward: Hal Jordan’s love interest Carol Ferris was introduced as the Vice-President of Ferris Aircraft and later took over the company from her father; Medusa, who was first introduced in the Fantastic Four series, is a member of the Inhuman Royal Family and a prominent statesperson within her people’s quasi-feudal society; and Carol Danvers, a decorated officer in the United States Air Force who would become a costumed superhero herself years later.

In 1975 Shotaro Ishinomori’s Himitsu Sentai Gorenger debuted on what is now TV Asahi, it brought the concepts of multi-colored teams and supporting vehicles that debuted in Gatchaman into live-action. In 1978, Toei adapted Spider-Man into a live-action series. In this continuity, Spider-Man had a vehicle called Marveller that could transform into a giant and powerful robot called Leopardon, this idea would be carried over to Toei’s Battle Fever J and now multi-colored teams not only had support vehicles but giant robots to fight giant monsters with.

1980s onward[edit]
In subsequent decades, popular characters like Dazzler, She-Hulk, Elektra, Catwoman, Witchblade, Spider-Girl, Batgirl and the Birds of Prey became stars of long-running eponymous titles. Female characters began assuming leadership roles in many ensemble superhero teams; the Uncanny X-Men series and its related spin-off titles in particular have included many female characters in pivotal roles since the 1970s.[30] Volume 4 of the X-Men comic book series featured an all-female team as part of the Marvel NOW! branding initiative in 2013.[31] Superpowered female characters like Buffy the Vampire Slayer[32] and Darna[33][34] have a tremendous influence on popular culture in their respective countries of origin.

With more and more anime, manga and Tokusatsu being translated or adapted, western audiences were beginning to experience the Japanese styles of superhero fiction more than they were able to before. Saban’s Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, an adaptation of Zyuranger created a multimedia franchise that used footage from Super Sentai.[35] Internationally, the Japanese comic book character, Sailor Moon, is recognized as one of the most important and popular female superheroes ever created

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