Counter Strike 1.6 – CSBD v1.1

Counter Strike 1.6 – CSBD v1.1

Counter Strike 1.6 – CSBD v1.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Download this  Counter Strike 1.6 – Click Here

 

 

Starting from version v1.0 CS1.6 CSBD I worked at a newer and more efficient, customer changes were made to Counter-Strike 1.6., I am sure that this version will be more perfect compared to the previous version

A CS personality, custom CsBlackDevil community, with a small role in the gaming world and advertising performance that is offered by the Counter-Strike.

CSBD v1.1 offers a complete safety, performance and quality throughout the entire period of play:

1. plugins like AutoConnect, gamemenu have no effect on the CS;

2. Orders amx_exec and amx_destroy, exterminated have no effect on the CS;

3. Due fpsbooster’s, FPS is now steadily between 99-100.5 due to high performance settings;

4. Commandmenu introduces several improvements, eg

musicmenu
botsmenu
game settings
AMXX menu
Team message, etc …

5. Due to the new changes to the faster you can connect to any server regardless of its location;
6. interface that is offered by this revolutionary CS CS’s world;
7. Skins simple as weapons;
8. Playeri Skins simple;
9. Favourite servers make their official presentation of the best servers in CSBD;
10. HD Texture;
11. MasterServer updated, plus it can not be changed by any plugin.
12. Countless appearances logo and advertising community in boosting our company, and social sites csbd community;
Ps: I leave you to discover the rest of the features that we offer this CS.

 

Counter-Strike: Condition Zero is a multiplayer video game and the follow-up to Counter-Strike. The game was released in 2004 using the GoldSrc engine. Condition Zero features a multiplayer mode, which features updated character models, textures, maps and other graphical tweaks. It also includes two single-player campaigns, including Condition Zero: Deleted Scenes.

Alongside various other Valve titles, the game received versions for OS X and Linux in 2013

Condition Zero started development in 2000 by Rogue Entertainment, and was initially announced in May 2001 at E3 of that year. Rogue’s producer for the game, Jim Molinet, later that year moved to Sony and the development company went defunct, leaving Valve empty. Later, they gave it to Gearbox Software, the developers of the Half-Life expansion packs, so that Valve could focus on the development rival Team Fortress 2 and its new engine.

Gearbox created an overhaul of Counter-Strike with high quality models and improved graphics. They also added alpha blending, allowing for realistic foliage and weather effects, a single-player mode to the game, similar to the final game, based on inspiration of Randy Pitchford from console games such as Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater and Gran Turismo 3: A-Spec, and they included explosive weapons such as a Molotov cocktails, tear gas bomb, and M72 LAW rocket. They also used the release of Steam to their advantage to help prevent cheating by ensuring constant code updates.

After a few developmental delays, it missed its late 2002 deadline and was given over to Ritual Entertainment, who completely remade the game into a single-player one with 20 unconnected missions. It was expected to be released in early 2003 with a secondary multiplayer mode by the upstart Turtle Rock Studios, and released alongside the Xbox version of Counter-Strike.

However, after declaring the game gold and handing out review copies of Ritual’s work, Valve saw an average review score of around 60%. The companies retracted the gold status and work on Condition Zero was essentially begun again. Ritual’s share of development was dropped, and Valve assigned Turtle Rock to finish development. They implemented a new bot AI that was beta tested in Counter-Strike 1.6 before release. The final game contained a version mirroring Gearbox’s version, along with 12 missions recovered from Ritual’s single-player portion, called Deleted Scenes

 

Condition Zero: Deleted Scenes is what is left over from Ritual Entertainment’s stage of development, a series of eighteen unconnected single-player missions.

Deleted Scenes was originally the focus on the game with standard multiplayer included. However, after declaring the game gold and handing out review copies of Ritual’s work, Valve saw an average review score of around 60%. The companies retracted the gold status and work on Condition Zero was essentially begun again. Ritual’s share of development was dropped, and Turtle Rock Studios eventually made its own version. The final game contained Ritual’s single-player portion, called Deleted Scenes, along with Turtle Rock’s version.

Several weapons from the “lost co” have made an appearance in Deleted Scenes, including the M72 Light Anti-Armor Weapon, and the M60 machine gun. Some are limited to the AI terrorists, such as the machete and Rogue Entertainment’s controversial suicide belt. Some reconnaissance weapons including the blow torch, radio, fiber-optic camera and remote control bombs. Players can also carry up to three grenades instead of the usual one. Moreover, the power of players’ Kevlar Armor is boosted, better protecting players from many projectiles and bullets.

Some weapons were completely reanimated. This includes the Colt, M4A1, AK47, FAMAS and Galil with the exception of the SIG SG 552 which uses its “beta animations”. Weapon textures are also slightly modified. The weapons are colored a bit differently from their Counter-Strike counterparts, such as the Arctic Warfare Magnum which is now brown instead of green, the Steyr AUG and the Colt M4 carbine are now two-tone police black instead of the usual colors. It initially came with twelve missions, but later Steam updates added six additional missions that were cut from the initial release. There is a small community for Deleted Scenes, and a few custom maps have been released

Several mechanisms have been proposed for the Moon’s formation 4.527 ± 0.010 billion years ago,[f] some 30–50 million years after the origin of the Solar System.[17] Recent research presented by Rick Carlson indicates a slightly lower age of between 4.40 and 4.45 billion years.[18] [19] These mechanisms included the fission of the Moon from Earth’s crust through centrifugal force[20] (which would require too great an initial spin of Earth),[21] the gravitational capture of a pre-formed Moon[22] (which would require an unfeasibly extended atmosphere of Earth to dissipate the energy of the passing Moon),[21] and the co-formation of Earth and the Moon together in the primordial accretion disk (which does not explain the depletion of metals in the Moon).[21] These hypotheses also cannot account for the high angular momentum of the Earth–Moon system.
The prevailing hypothesis today is that the Earth–Moon system formed as a result of a giant impact, where a Mars-sized body (named Theia) collided with the newly formed proto-Earth, blasting material into orbit around it that accreted to form the Moon.[24][25]

This hypothesis perhaps best explains the evidence, although not perfectly. Eighteen months prior to an October 1984 conference on lunar origins, Bill Hartmann, Roger Phillips, and Jeff Taylor challenged fellow lunar scientists: “You have eighteen months. Go back to your Apollo data, go back to your computer, do whatever you have to, but make up your mind. Don’t come to our conference unless you have something to say about the Moon’s birth.” At the 1984 conference at Kona, Hawaii, the giant impact hypothesis emerged as the most popular.

Before the conference, there were partisans of the three “traditional” theories, plus a few people who were starting to take the giant impact seriously, and there was a huge apathetic middle who didn’t think the debate would ever be resolved. Afterward there were essentially only two groups: the giant impact camp and the agnostics.[26]

Giant impacts are thought to have been common in the early Solar System. Computer simulations modelling a giant impact are consistent with measurements of the angular momentum of the Earth–Moon system and the small size of the lunar core. These simulations also show that most of the Moon came from the impactor, not from the proto-Earth.[27] However, more-recent tests suggest more of the Moon coalesced from Earth and not the impactor.[28][29][30][31] Meteorites show that other inner Solar System bodies such as Mars and Vesta have very different oxygen and tungsten isotopic compositions to Earth, whereas Earth and the Moon have nearly identical isotopic compositions. Post-impact mixing of the vaporized material between the forming Earth and Moon could have equalized their isotopic compositions,[32] although this is debated.[33]

The large amount of energy released in the giant impact event and the subsequent re-accretion of material in Earth orbit would have melted the outer shell of Earth, forming a magma ocean.[34][35] The newly formed Moon would also have had its own lunar magma ocean; estimates for its depth range from about 500 km (300 miles) to the entire radius of the Moon (1,737 km (1,079 miles)).[34]

Despite its accuracy in explaining many lines of evidence, there are still some difficulties that are not fully explained by the giant impact hypothesis, most of them involving the Moon’s composition.
In 2001, a team at the Carnegie Institute of Washington reported the most precise measurement of the isotopic signatures of lunar rocks.[37] To their surprise, the team found that the rocks from the Apollo program carried an isotopic signature that was identical with rocks from Earth, and were different from almost all other bodies in the Solar System. Because most of the material that went into orbit to form the Moon was thought to come from Theia, this observation was unexpected. In 2007, researchers from the California Institute of Technology announced that there was less than a 1% chance that Theia and Earth had identical isotopic signatures.[38] Published in 2012, an analysis of titanium isotopes in Apollo lunar samples showed that the Moon has the same composition as Earth,[39] which conflicts with what is expected if the Moon formed far from Earth’s orbit or from Theia. Variations on the giant impact hypothesis may explain this data.
The Moon is a differentiated body: it has a geochemically distinct crust, mantle, and core. The Moon has a solid iron-rich inner core with a radius of 240 km (150 mi) and a fluid outer core primarily made of liquid iron with a radius of roughly 300 km (190 mi). Around the core is a partially molten boundary layer with a radius of about 500 km (310 mi).[41] This structure is thought to have developed through the fractional crystallization of a global magma ocean shortly after the Moon’s formation 4.5 billion years ago.[42] Crystallization of this magma ocean would have created a mafic mantle from the precipitation and sinking of the minerals olivine, clinopyroxene, and orthopyroxene; after about three-quarters of the magma ocean had crystallised, lower-density plagioclase minerals could form and float into a crust on top.[43] The final liquids to crystallise would have been initially sandwiched between the crust and mantle, with a high abundance of incompatible and heat-producing elements.[1] Consistent with this, geochemical mapping from orbit shows the crust is mostly anorthosite,[9] and Moon rock samples of the flood lavas erupted on the surface from partial melting in the mantle confirm the mafic mantle composition, which is more iron rich than that of Earth.[1] Geophysical techniques suggest that the crust is on average circa 50 km (31 mi) thick.[1]

The Moon is the second-densest satellite in the Solar System, after Io.[44] However, the inner core of the Moon is small, with a radius of about 350 km (220 mi) or less,[1] around 20% of the radius of the Moon. Its composition is not well constrained, but it is probably metallic iron alloyed with a small amount of sulfur and nickel; analyses of the Moon’s time-variable rotation indicate that it is at least partly molten.
The topography of the Moon has been measured with laser altimetry and stereo image analysis.[46] The most visible topographic feature is the giant far-side South Pole–Aitken basin, some 2,240 km (1,390 mi) in diameter, the largest crater on the Moon and the second-largest confirmed impact crater in the Solar System.[47][48] At 13 km (8.1 mi) deep, its floor is the lowest point on the surface of the Moon.[47][49] The highest elevations on the surface of the Moon are located directly to the northeast, and it has been suggested that this area might have been thickened by the oblique formation impact of the South Pole–Aitken basin.[50] Other large impact basins, such as Imbrium, Serenitatis, Crisium, Smythii, and Orientale, also possess regionally low elevations and elevated rims.[47] The lunar far side is on average about 1.9 km (1.2 mi) higher than the near side.[1]

The discovery of fault scarp cliffs by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter suggest that the Moon has shrunk within the past billion years, by a radius of about 90 metres (300 ft).[51] Similar shrinkage features exist on Mercury.

The dark and relatively featureless lunar plains that can clearly be seen with the naked eye are called maria (Latin for “seas”; singular mare), because they were believed by ancient astronomers to be filled with water.[52] They are now known to be vast solidified pools of ancient basaltic lava. Although similar to terrestrial basalts, lunar basalts have more iron and no minerals altered by water.[53][54] The majority of these lavas erupted or flowed into the depressions associated with impact basins. Several geologic provinces containing shield volcanoes and volcanic domes are found within the near side maria.

Almost all maria are on the near side of the Moon, covering 31% of the surface on the near side,[56] compared with a few scattered patches on the far side covering only 2%.[57] This is thought to be due to a concentration of heat-producing elements under the crust on the near side, seen on geochemical maps obtained by Lunar Prospector’s gamma-ray spectrometer, which would have caused the underlying mantle to heat up, partially melt, rise to the surface and erupt.[43][58][59] Most of the Moon’s mare basalts erupted during the Imbrian period, 3.0–3.5 billion years ago, although some radiometrically dated samples are as old as 4.2 billion years.[60] Until recently, the youngest eruptions, dated by crater counting, appeared to have been only 1.2 billion years ago.[61] In 2006, a study of Ina, a tiny depression in Lacus Felicitatis, found jagged, relatively dust-free features that, due to the lack of erosion by infalling debris, appeared to be only 2 million years old.[62] Moonquakes and releases of gas also indicate some continued lunar activity.[62] In 2014 NASA announced “widespread evidence of young lunar volcanism” at 70 irregular mare patches identified by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, some less than 50 million years old. This raises the possibility of a much warmer lunar mantle than previously believed, at least on the near side where the deep crust is substantially warmer due to the greater concentration of radioactive elements.[63][64][65][66] Just prior to this, evidence has been presented for 2–10 million years younger basaltic volcanism inside Lowell crater,[67][68] Orientale basin, located in the transition zone between the near and far sides of the Moon. An initially hotter mantle and/or local enrichment of heat-producing elements in the mantle could be responsible for prolonged activities also on the far side in the Orientale basin.[69][70]

The lighter-coloured regions of the Moon are called terrae, or more commonly highlands, because they are higher than most maria. They have been radiometrically dated to having formed 4.4 billion years ago, and may represent plagioclase cumulates of the lunar magma ocean.[60][61] In contrast to Earth, no major lunar mountains are believed to have formed as a result of tectonic events.[71]

The concentration of maria on the Near Side likely reflects the substantially thicker crust of the highlands of the Far Side, which may have formed in a slow-velocity impact of a second moon of Earth a few tens of millions of years after their formation

 

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    universali 3 years

    qka po ma qet si po hi diqka po shkrun cd me shkru do sene a sdi qka sun po hi hiq

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    o admin po qet diqka kur po hin me shkru tani me lu qka duhet me shkru

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    RiMi LS 3 years

    c0d3 mos ki naj cs zm addons

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      admin 3 years

      Nuk kam models,skin,weapons nuk maj modela mvjen keq gamebanana.com mundesh me gjet

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    IphOone AL 7 months

    Qa ka bre kur hi n cs ma qet me jep diqka

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